November 25, 2014

EPA is taking Public Comments until the end of 2014

Posted in EPA Authority, Florida Tank Cleaning, Florida Tank Inspection, Inspecting & Cleaning Potable Water Storage, Potable Water Tank Cleaning, Potable Water Tank Inspection tagged , , , , , , , at 3:50 pm by Ron Perrin

On October 15th 2014 the EPA held a meeting to decide if there should be a rule to require water storage tanks and towers to be cleaned and inspected.

The webinar is over but the EPA is still taking comments until the end of 2014.  If you would like to make a comment on this issue, please send an e-mail to:  SFIWebinar@cadmusgroup.com. Or take the poll below and I will send in the results at the end of the year.  This is a chance to let your opinion be known!

My customers tell me they need less chlorine to meet water quality standards after I remove the sediment from water storage thanks and towers.  Sediment enters the tank one particle at a time and eventually accumulates enough for bacteria, protozoa and even viruses to use it as a habitat, grow and become a serious health

10-14-14 Washington D.C. Mall

10-14-14 Washington D.C. Mall

problem.  If proper inspections are not done to determine sediment levels, corrective action is seldom, if ever, taken.  My opinion is that potable water storage facilities should be inspected inside and out every year, and a cleaning program to ensure tanks and towers are cleaned every 3 to 5 years should be in place on all tanks.  What do you think?

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December 6, 2011

DIVING INSPECTIONS with NO Disruption in Water Utility Service!

Posted in Florida Potable Water Tank Inspection, FLORIDA Rule 62-555.350., Florida Tank Inspection, Inspecting & Cleaning Potable Water Storage tagged , , , , , at 9:51 pm by Ron Perrin

DESCO Air Hat Diver

Photo:  Preparing to dive potable a five million gallon clearwell at a water plant.

Our equipment is purchased for and only used in potable water.  Our divers are Commercially certified through training approved by the Association of Diving Contractors.  We primarily service Texas, the Midwest and the Southeast States.   Our Florida tank inspections are performed at the direction of a Licensed Florida P.E. and our inspection reports include his summary and seal to meet all Florida State Requirements at no additional charge.

Divers are able to inspect or clean water storage tanks and towers with no disruption in service and minimal water loss.  Our wide range of inspection services also includes a specially built “Remote Underwater Video Camera”  (Shown Below) and a Remotely Controlled Vehicle (ROV).  We have the right inspection for your water utility.       Call toll free 1-888-481-1768 for a free quote.

Remote underwater Camera

Call us toll free at 888-481-1768 or simply fill out the form below:

(c) Ron Perrin 2014

September 15, 2010

Tank Inspection with No Disruption in Service

Posted in FLORIDA Rule 62-555.350., Florida Tank Inspection, Inspecting & Cleaning Potable Water Storage tagged , , at 2:17 pm by Ron Perrin

Our potable water dive crew is able to fully inspect your tanks without draining them. We cover all AWWA and Florida tank inspection points. Our inspection reports average 14 pages with digital photographs and a DVD of underwater conditions. Please see the inspection page at http://www.ronperrin.com for more details. Our Florida Licensed engineer will insure all requirements of Florida Rule 62-555.350 are met.  Our potable water dive crew is also available to clean your water storage tanks with little if any disruption in your water service.

Ron Perrin Water Technologies Logo

Call for a free quote today 888-481-1768        or  email   ronlooks@aol.com

Visit our main web page at http://www.ronperrin.com

September 2, 2016

New Non-Profit focus on water tank & tower cleaning and inspection.

Posted in Uncategorized at 12:06 pm by Ron Perrin

The inspection and cleaning of water storage tanks is important to the health of a water system and important to people who drink from it.

The Ron Perrin Clean Water Tank Project, Inc. is now designated as a 501 (c) 3 by the Internal Revenue Service and has been Incorporated by the Texas Secretary of State as a Nonprofit Corporation.

Check out our blog and take the poll at:
www.ronperrincleanwatertankproject.org

Our Mission: To promote the safe inspection and cleaning of water storage tanks and towers. We plan to do this with our blog, publications and film.
Please help support this mission with a $2 donation just to show you care about this issue.

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April 10, 2016

Job Opening

Posted in Dive Supervisor Wanted, DIVER JOB, Inspecting & Cleaning Potable Water Storage, Potable Water Tank Cleaning, Potable Water Tank Inspection tagged , , , , , at 10:10 am by Ron Perrin

DIVE SUPERVISOR – COMMERCIAL DIVE TEAM

ESTABLISHED WATER TANK AND TOWER INSPECTION AND CLEANING COMPANY is seeking an experienced commercial dive supervisor or crew member.  Our company office is located in Fort Worth, Texas.  We are looking for a self starting, self supervising, dependsble person to help us develop and maintain clients in FLORIDA!20151209_103650_001

Inspection training may be provided to the right individual. Out of town travel is required (typically 3-4 days per week).

Fall protection and confined space training is required and may be provided for the right individual. CURRENT SCUBA Certification and recent diving physical is required, preference given to ADC Certified Dive Supervisor. Employment is year round on as needed basis. Pay based on experience. Pre-employment drug screening is required. This position requires frequent out of town travel, paid by company (from Fort Worth, Texas) or per-diem for independent contractors. Please e-mail resume.

For additional information and application see: www.ronperrin.com
compensation: Starting Crew Member pay  105 to 140.00
Starting supervisors Pay 145.00 to 170.00 per day. Based on certification and experience.  Pay is negotiable upon growth of company!  We GROW YOU GROW!
For more information about our company check out these links!
www.facebook.com/ronperrinwatertech
Our Company Blogs:
www.tankdiver.us
www.CleanWaterTankProject.com 
Are you ready for your close up see: Our Film Project
Out of Sight Out of Mind-
www.facebook.com/cleanwatertankproject 

October 9, 2015

Ron Perrin – new profile at www.ronperrin.info

Posted in Uncategorized tagged , , , , , at 11:33 pm by Ron Perrin

I have a new profile at BrandYourself.com.  This may not be exactly water related but it should help this page show up higher in search results.  So, if you are looking for the RON PERRIN of “Ron Perrin Water Technologies” I am the guy.   If this helps people connect with my water tank and tower inspection and cleaning services I am sure it is worth a few lines on this blog.  Ron Perrin may not be as common as John Smith but there are several around the world.  I originally named my company “Ron Perrin Water Technologies” to let water utility managers know I was no longer with “U.S. Underwater Services”.  What I did not know was that advertising my name would bump me into so many people around the world also named Ron Perrin.

ronperrin.us

Is also “The Clean Water Tank Drinking Water Project” blog.  This is basically my passion project.  After getting involved in using divers to perform water storage tank inspection and cleaning I soon found storage tanks are an overlooked and underserved part of our water systems. Sediment gathers in the bottom of tanks and towers.  Over time a few inches can support a wide variety of bacteria, protozoa like cryptosporidium and even viruses.  This blog was set up to be an educational tool allowing water utility managers and the public they serve to understand the importance of water tank and tower inspection and cleaning programs.

You can see new profile page a www.ronperrin.info 

My primary company web site is www.ronperrin.com

You can find information about potable water tank & tower inspections here: Ron Perrin Inspection Link

Water tank & tower cleaning information can be found Here: Ron Perrin Cleaning Link

Our Clean water tank Project blog is at:  https://ronperrin.wordpress.com, http://www.ronperrin.us

or http://www.cleanwatertankproject.com

By Ron Perrin OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA (c)2008

By Ron Perrin
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
(c)2008

For the most up to date info check out my company Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/ronperrinwatertech and just to be sure our company can be found when looking for a water tank inspector we have a NEW web site at www.watertankinspection.com

RPWT Office is open M-F 9-5

Located in Fort Worth, Texas

we serve Texas, Florida and most of the midwest, southwest and southeast U.S.

Phone: 817-377-4899   Fax 817-246-1740

Our Office Manager will be glad to answer any inquiry e-mail:                                                                                        tankinspections@aol.com

June 23, 2015

ARE YOU A CUSTOMER?

Posted in Uncategorized at 1:19 pm by Ron Perrin

Please write a review, we would love to post your comments about our service. We are celebrating our 18th year inspecting and cleaning water storage tanks and towers. I am proud to report that I have maintained my first customer this entire time. We now have many utilities we have serviced for over 17 years. Old or new, if you are one of our customers we would like to hear from you! Please take a minute and write a short review on our Facebook page page!

https://www.facebook.com/ronperrinwatertech

May 25, 2015

Mission Main Street Grants

Posted in Uncategorized at 10:49 pm by Ron Perrin

Mission Main Street Grants

Thanks to your support we made it to the judging phase of the Mission Main Street Grants program from Chase! We are in the running for a $100,000 grant and a trip to LinkedIn HQ. Recipients will be announced in September – wish us luck!

Thanks

Ron Perrin

November 24, 2014

EPA may have new regulations on Potable Water Storage

Posted in Uncategorized at 1:59 am by Ron Perrin

The EPA is currently considering a regulation that would require all water storage facilities to be inspected and cleaned at regular intervals. This new requirement could improve the water quality for millions of Americans.

Remote underwater Camera

Remote underwater Camera

 

 

The EPA is taking comments on this proposed regulation until the end of the year. We have the contact information posted on our blog, or you can just take our poll at: www.cleanwatertankproject.com. The poll results will be turned in to the EPA at the end of the year.

Sediment being removed

 

Find us on FACEBOOK

or connect with Ron on Linked-In

September 16, 2014

Naegleria fowleri Alive and well in another Louisiana water system.

Posted in Uncategorized at 12:04 pm by Ron Perrin

Ron Perrin Clean Water Tank Project

Shreveport Times reports that positive results for Naegleria fowleri were found in Ebarb, Louisiana. The positive results were in the system’s lines in the Aimwell area, which serves 5,529 people. Reported by
Vickie Welborn, September 12, 2014.

EBARB – The Ebarb Water System has tested positive for the brain-eating amoeba, according to state health officials. The Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals said the infected water was sampled in August as part of its surveillance program. DHH learned the Ebarb system was not in compliance with the state’s emergency rule, which requires water systems to maintain a minimum disinfectant residual level of 0.5 milligrams per liter throughout all of their distribution lines. That level is known to control Naegleria fowleri.
The positive results were in the system’s lines in the Aimwell area, which serves 5,529 people. There have been no reports of illnesses in Sabine Parish as a result of…

View original post 50 more words

August 17, 2014

Now we can add a brain-eating amoeba to the list of contaminants that can be in tank sediment

Posted in Inspecting & Cleaning Potable Water Storage, Potable Water Tank Cleaning, Uncategorized tagged , , , , at 12:47 am by Ron Perrin

Removing sediment from the floor of your water tanks and towers may also be removing the habitat that allows bacteria, protozoa and viruses from getting a foothold in your distribution system.   Now we can add a brain-eating amoeba to the list of contaminants that the sediment on the floor of your water storage tank can support.

Number of Case-reports of Primary Amebic Meningoencephalitis Caused by Naegleria fowler

September 16, 2013, NBC News reported: “Deadly brain amoeba infects US tap water for the first time”. The death of a 4-year-old boy near Violet, LA., was linked to the Naegleria fowleri amoeba. The child had been playing on a backyard slip-n-slide that used water from the St. Bernard Parish water system, that was later found to be contaminated with the amoeba. “Tests show it’s present throughout the water supply system in St. Bernard Parish, directly southeast of New Orleans.”

According to the CDC:  “Naegleria fowleri (commonly referred to as the “brain-eating amoeba” or “brain-eating ameba”), is a free-living microscopic ameba, (single-cehttp://www.cdc.gov/parasites/images/naegleria/naegleria-cases-by-state-logo.jpglled living organism). It can cause a rare and devastating infection of the brain called primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). The ameba is commonly found in warm freshwater (e.g. lakes, rivers, and hot springs) and soil. Naegleria fowleri usually infects people when contaminated water enters the body through the nose. Once the ameba enters the nose, it travels to the brain where it causes PAM, which is usually fatal. Infection typically occurs when people go swimming or diving in warm freshwater places, like lakes and rivers. In very rare instances,Naegleria infections may also occur when contaminated water from other sources (such as inadequately chlorinated swimming pool water or heated and contaminated tap water) enters the nose. You cannot get infected from drinking water contaminated with Naegleria.”

 

The CDC also tested nearby DeSoto Parish Waterworks Dist. #1 because it was the near the site of an infection that happened in 2011 from non-potable water (lake or river, etc.). On October 8, 2013, The CDC confirmed the presence of the rare amoeba in five locations in DeSoto Parish Waterworks Dist. #1.

Heat is also a factor, an increase in only ten degrees can double the speed of bacteria growth. As record high temperatures become more common in summer months we see that keeping water distribution tanks free of sediment build up may be more important than ever before. Removing the sediment from your water tank may prevent a disaster before it can ever start.

Number of Case-reports of Primary Amebic Meningoencephalitis by State of Exposure:

Ron Perrin is the owner of Ron Perrin Water Technologies in Fort Worth, Texas. Since 1997 his company has inspected over six thousand water storage tanks and towers in 14 states. Ron may be contacted through his web site at www.ronperrin.com

February 11, 2014

Rare amoeba found in drinking water system

Posted in Potable Water Tank Cleaning, Potable Water Tank Inspection tagged , at 12:46 am by Ron Perrin

August 2013, the death of a 4-year-old boy staying near Violet, Louisiana, was linked to the Naegleria fowleri amoeba. The child had been playing on a slip and slide connected to the St. Bernard Parish’s water system that was later found to be contaminated with the amoeba.

More common in Australia NBC news reported that this was the first case in the U.S.

For more see: “Four year old’s Death linked to Rare Amoeba in Water System”

Over time almost all tanks accumulate sediment on the floor. Any amount of sediment can become a habitat for bacteria, protozoa (like Cryptosporidium) and viruses. However, when tests show chlorine depletion, the idea of removing the sediment is usually not thought of. Additional treatment chemicals are usually the first line of defense, quickly becoming chemical warfare and potentially leaving the tank with low, or no, chlorine protection for long periods. American Water Works Association (AWWA) recommends that potable water storage tanks be cleaned every 3 to five years. Few states actually require tanks to be cleaned on a regular basis, and some don’t require it at all.

When a contaminant (bacteria, protozoa or viruses) enters a water storage tank and finds sediment to get a foothold in, chlorine can be quickly depleted while the contaminants grow under the protection of the sediment. Even otherwise harmless bacteria can help to deplete chlorine reserves leaving the tank vulnerable to more dangerous contaminants.

Removing sediment from the floor of potable water storage tanks greatly reduces the chance that any contaminant can get a foothold in the distribution system and grow to become a larger problem.

So why isn’t cleaning potable water storage tanks a common practice? Removing tanks from service to perform cleaning is time consuming and expensive. The smaller the water utility, the more difficult it is to find the budget for preventive maintenance.  There are many contractors that offer Potable Water Dive crews that can remove floor sediment with little or no down time and minimal water loss. Using a qualified potable water dive crew to clean water storage tanks can save the water utility time and water.

Keeping potable water storage tanks free of accumulated sediment is essential for the health of the system and the health of your customers. If you administer a drinking water system, make a plan to schedule cleanings and stick to it.

References:

For more information on Potable Water Divers see:  www.ronperrin.com

For more information on Naegleria fowleri amoeba in drinking water see:

http://www.cdc.gov/parasites/naegleria/public-water-systems.html

NOTE: You cannot be infected with Naegleria fowleri by drinking contaminated water. In very rare instances, Naegleria infections may also occur when contaminated water from other sources (such as inadequately chlorinated swimming pool water or contaminated tap water) enters the nose. (For example: when people submerge their heads or cleanse their noses during religious practices, and when people irrigate their sinuses (nose) using contaminated tap water.)

– Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 

Cryptosporidium Drinking Water Health Advisory  EPA  March 2001

 

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